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49 - A Gate of Hell
50 - Die Atombombe
51 - "Almost a Miracle!"
52 - Operation Ichi-Go

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(NEW) 2017 Annual - Six Days of War

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Against the Odds magazine investigates military history from a broad perspective. The economic, political, religious and social aspects of warfare are examined in concert with events on the battlefield.

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50 - Die Atombombe

“We have invisible aircraft, submarines, colossal tanks and cannon, unbelievably powerful rockets, and a bomb with a working that will astonish the whole world.... All my words are the purest truth. That you will see. We still have things that need to be finished, and when they are finished, they will turn the tide.”

-- Adolf Hitler addressing 9th Army officers, March 1945

“The wonder weapons are the hope...The well-known mass destruction bombs are nearly ready. In only a few days, with the utmost meticulous intelligence, Hitler will probably execute this fearful blow....It appears, that there are three bombs - and each has an astonishing operation. The construction of each unit is fearfully complex and of a lengthy time of completion.”

-- Benito Mussolini, Political Testament, April 1945

In the end, the vain hopes expressed above were all lies and delusions of course. But their genesis started in late 1941 with senior officials across Germany becoming increasingly aware that Operation Barbarossa would fail somewhere short of Moscow. Many worriedly began looking for an “out.” Some, like Ernst Udet, head of Luftwaffe Development, and Walter Borbet, a leading industrialist, shot themselves over the shock of the failure. Others, like General Fromm, in charge of the Army Weapons Office, turned their attention to an extraordinary proposal by Germany’s leading physicists to unlock the secrets of the atom and provide limitless power, and a possible war winning explosive device, the atomic bomb.

Die Atombombe is a card game for 2 to 5 players. Each player represents a faction inside German government, industry, or military circles, seeking to engage one of the Reich's prestigious research institutes to start work on a nuclear program.

Acting through the Director of each center, players will need to size matters up, recruit other scientists, acquire scarce resources, (plus spy on their rivals, this is the Third Reich remember) and certainly go all out if they hope to develop atomic weapons...

...Or some players may instead focus on mastering and commercializing the secrets of the atom, hoarding both knowledge and resources for the “glorious post-war economy” they fondly imagine is sure to come after the war has been won through more conventional means.

Progress is slow at first - the Russians are far away and the enormity of the effort seems clear early on. And there are always other weapons more desperately needed now.

As the course of the war darkens for Germany, players may see more official support being thrown their way, or engage in fruitless bickering among themselves over the best theories and resources required to succeed. Their finest scientists may even be drafted to serve as simple soldiers at the front!

Fast and quick playing, Die Atombombe shows just how easy it was to be bewitched by the idea, and how hard it really was to mount an effective nuclear program under the increasing rain of Allied bombs and the Soviet menace looming to the east.

Die Atombombe and issue #50 of ATO:

Cards - 108 colorful playing cards
Counters - 64 large 5/8" die-cut pieces
Rules length - 10 pages
Charts and tables - 1 page
Complexity - Low
Solitaire suitability - Low
Playing time - Up to 1 to 2 hours

Design - Steven Cunliffe
Development - C. Rawling
Graphic Design - Mark Mahaffey



  

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50 - Die Atombombe
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Six Days of War, designed by Paul Rohrbaugh, examines the event of 50 years ago where Israel launched pre-emptive attacks against the neighboring Arab countries that had vowed to destroy her… and won. It changed everything. And yet, it also established a kind of stasis in which little seems to have changed in those subsequent 50 years. How can that be?

It was a war fought with a mixture of weapon types that ranged from the very latest jets to leftover WW2 equipment… yet reached a decisive conclusion in less than one week. With today’s “little wars” that drag on year after year, the idea of a real conclusion in just a week—with a declared winner and losers—staggers the imagination.

Six Days of War comes with 180 full color, die cut counters representing Israeli and the various Arab states involved in the fighting, with a 22" x 34" color map divided into THREE distinctly different battlefield areas, covering the Sinai Peninsula, the West Bank, and Galilee/Golan. Ground units are mostly brigades and regiments while air units (with extensive coverage of the many plane types) represent 24 to 36 planes. Each full game turn equals one day, with 10 turns as the maximum possible time.

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